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DocuBox programa siūlo išskirtinių dokumentinių filmų rinkinį, kuriame nagrinėjamos tikros žmonių istorijos, socialinės problemos, moksliniai atradimai, kultūros reiškiniai ir t.t.. DocuBox programa kviečia pasinerti į dokumentiniuose filmuose nagrinėjamas istorijos, gamtos, technologijų, žmogaus teisių ir aplinkosaugos temas, kurios sužadina smalsumą, skatina diskusijas ir įsitraukimą į bendruomenines veiklas bei kritinį mąstymą.
TV Programa
2024-03-03
(sekmadienis)
02:00
The New Man Of Azerbaijan
Still today, there are no phones, no Internet and no newspapers in the remote areas of Azerbaijan. The newsman or "Ashig" has always played an important role in this Eastern culture over the centuries. Without them, the inhabitants would be radically cut off from the rest of the world and all its news. Certain distinguished representatives of their guild still travel the country's mountains to the remotest areas, to spread news, stories and the latest gossip. One of these representatives is Nemet, the old and honorable Aschug from Baku, who has been practicing this skill for a very long time. Like all Aschugs, he transmits his information through song!
03:00
A Counter History Of Internet
A look back at the emergence of Internet freedom defence movements that have sprung up in reaction to growing regulation of the Web by governments and multinationals. Internet was created by hippies while being funded by the military! This improbable culture shock gave birth to an area of freedom that was impossible to censor or control. Yet for years, that is precisely what a certain number of political leaders have sought to do, prompting hackers and defenders of freedom to enter the political arena.
04:00
Bhutan In the Pursuit Of Happiness
Nestled in the heart of the Himalayas, the small kingdom of Bhutan has decided to do away with the dictatorship of Gross Domestic Product and economic growth at all costs. A new wealth indicator has now become the country's gold standard: Gross National Happiness. Launched by the country's fourth King, the "new paradigm" is based on four pillars: protection of the environment; conservation and promotion of Bhutanese culture; good governance; and responsible and sustainable economic development.
05:00
Quirky Science
In contrast with popular belief, Edison did not invent the light bulb. Many people contributed to the invention. Mind you, the first lamp was invented around 70,000 BC. Once upon a time we had limelight, which was actually quite unsafe, and then there were arc "arc lamps" – shedding light that blinded movie stars up to the point where they had to wear sunglasses. What Edison did was improve the light bulb to become a practical, affordable and safe product. He tested over 5000 filaments to make the bulb last: from bamboo fiber to a hair out of an assistant's beard. At the same time others were working on light bulbs made with gasses, which we now know as energy efficient lamps. Modern-day lighting innovations are quite startling, a lot of them - we can't even see with the naked eye… Lasers, for example. For the longest time it was merely a pet-theory of the grand Einstein. Nobody knew what to make of this idea that "atoms could release their excess energy as light" When the laser was invented, people joked that the laser was 'a solution looking for a problem'. Now it is omnipresent. In the near future: laser-light therapy by flashing the human brain.
05:30
Quirky Science
A man with an ear for music, one of the first to try teaching the deaf how to speak, thought he could build a "harmonic telegraph". He had this idea that several notes could travel through a wire simultaneously, instead of the one Morse code that the telegraph could transmit. He thought this to be possible because he misinterpreted the writings of a researcher writing in German – a language he did not know. – And would later describe his misinterpretation as a "very valuable blunder". The man was Alexander Graham Bell and he invented telephony. The big question is: what happens in that wire? How can voices travel? Bell and his assistant eventually proved that different tones would vary the strength of an electric current in a wire. In fact, it's the vibrations of the voice that determine the strength of the current. His invention caused a lot of fuss – yet it took years before people comprehended the scale of it: before the widespread use of the phone – whom were you going to call? Eventually, the telephone, or better said, its wiring, leads to the Internet. Nowadays we mostly make our calls "wireless" so the wire Graham Bell used to make voices travel over long distances is no longer needed How does that work? Even wireless calling, some say, is actually a very unnatural way of communicating. Looking at the future, are we heading towards a "phoneless" call?
06:00
Africa's Creative Killers
On the plains of East Africa an epic journey is underway. Millions of wildebeest and thousands of zebras march in an annual, circular migration in search of lush grazing.Two major rivers, the Mara and the Grumeti, intersect their route and force the herds to cross. Crocodiles, the biggest living on earth, wait in these rivers to take advantage of this moving feast. In this ever-changing waterscape successful predators adapt their hunting strategies to suit the shifting environment.On the Grumeti River, DC is the Dominant Croc of a lose gang called the RagTags. When the wildebeest arrive to drink, these Pit Stops, Zone 1, are the crocs' first challenge. It doesn't go well for the RagTags. These smaller, inexperienced crocs don't calculate their launch speed correctly, so opportunities are missed. DC finds a pool where he can work alone. He grabs an impressive male zebra, but the pool's not deep enough to drown it. The zebra fights hard and DC is forced to let it go.Deep Water, Zone 2, is a zone exclusive to the Mara River. Steep banks and fast-flowing water make it a river that favours the crocodiles. Wildebeest plunge off the cliffs straight into the deep channel. To hunt here is easy: Swim, launch and drown.There's no free lunch on the Grumeti. DC waits for the next opportunity. He picks up vibrations in the water that tell him the herds have started to cross. Zone 3, The Shallows, is a dangerous zone for crocodiles. Wildebeest gallop across the river and crocodiles can get trampled. DC captures a calf but the RagTags share with him and DC is left with a single mouthful. Frustrated with his small portion, DC drives the gang away. Theft is a viable strategy in the Grumeti. The RagTags follow DC when he tries to hoard his next prize. When DC spots one of the gang members and gives chase, the RagTags move in and steal the carcass.DC finds another opportunity on the Rocks, Zone 4. Wildebeest are forced to walk slowly to avoid tripping and falling. DC causes panic in the ranks and grabs a calf.This time he won't share. He flicks the calf until the head tears right off the neck. Exhausted from the hunt, DC is forced to rest and recharge. He's not alone. This pool belongs to a hippopotamus. Luckily the hippo is more curious that confrontational and he leaves DC alone. As the season moves on, the Grumeti River dries up. Only the tail-enders of the herd remain and DC needs one last kill before the herds disappear for good.On the Mara River the water itself is so treacherous that many animals die while crossing. Carcasses pile up on the riverbank, and the crocs here can scavenge long after the wildebeest have left. DC will have to hunt if he wants a stockpile. When the herds unexpectedly drink at the hippo pool, DC sets up for a Pit Stop attack. But suddenly they start to cross and it becomes a Rock Crossing!Wildebeest trample over him but he strikes a big wildebeest bull and holds tight. The hippo pool is not deep enough for a quick death. But DC outlasts the wildebeest in the tug-of-war. \n\n\nThe Mara and Grumeti are two very different hunting grounds that require unique skillsets from the crocodiles. In both these trenches the predators responded to the nuances of the landscape and triumphed.\n\nAt the Pit Stops and Rocks, in Deep and Shallow Water they learned to modify their hunting techniques – and thrived. And next year, when the herds return, these quiet waters will once again transform into Predator Zones.
07:00
Mindworks
Understanding how we think and see by playing games with our brains. This factual entertainment series explores the way we see and interpret the world around us with engaging tests, activities, demonstrations and explanations. In each episode we experience visual and audio illusions, sensory puzzles and brain tricks from the worlds of art, science, nature and psychology and learn why they baffle our senses.
07:30
Mindworks
Understanding how we think and see by playing games with our brains. This factual entertainment series explores the way we see and interpret the world around us with engaging tests, activities, demonstrations and explanations. In each episode we experience visual and audio illusions, sensory puzzles and brain tricks from the worlds of art, science, nature and psychology and learn why they baffle our senses.
08:00
European Islands
The European islands are renowned primarily for their hotel resorts. However, we will show you a completely different face of theirs: forests, beaches, coves, mountains, valleys and rivers. Perhaps you will find places that will take your breath away. Why just lie on the beach when there is so much to see? Put on some good hiking shoes, pull your shoelaces tight, and get to know the entire island like the back of your hand.
08:35
European Islands
The European islands are renowned primarily for their hotel resorts. However, we will show you a completely different face of theirs: forests, beaches, coves, mountains, valleys and rivers. Perhaps you will find places that will take your breath away. Why just lie on the beach when there is so much to see? Put on some good hiking shoes, pull your shoelaces tight, and get to know the entire island like the back of your hand.
09:05
Historic Football Match In Florence
Florence, the cradle of the Renaissance, is today a so-called "museum-city". The small city center is invaded by thousands of tourists every day. But there is one sport tourists usually don't know : the calcio florentino, a violent game with no rules, exclusively for Florentine people. Struggling with the consequences of gentrification, the city is losing its identity and its citizens. But there is still one way in which Florence and the "Fiorentini" can express their own identity - the "Calcio Storico Fiorentino" (Historical Florentine soccer), a game that has been played in Florence for 800 years but only 3 days a year in the month of June! This primitive, tough and dangerous mix of football and boxing is played in one of the world's most famous squares, the Piazza Santa Croce. The players can hit the ball with their hands or feet, and they can stop their adversaries in any way possible. These two rules make the game one of the roughest sports ever played.
10:00
Tuning 2 You: India's Lost Musicians
High in the eastern mountains in a remote corner of India, Soumik encounters the Naga tribes. They teach him about their mysterious customs, chicken dances and head-hunting traditions, part of a unique identity at the brink of extinction. The Nagas wish to preserve.
10:30
Tuning 2 You: India's Lost Musicians
In the world's oldest city of Varanasi, Soumik explores a neighbourhood that has produced five generations of Indian classical masters. He meets widowed women singers who have committed their lives to the Hindu God, Shiva, and a young drummer with the talent to make it big. Dedication to fading classical arts is formidable in this timeless city of religion, tradition and rising commercial interests.
11:00
My Dubai
Events - National Day, concerts starring Sting, James Blunt and Katy Perry, the world's richest horse race the Dubai Cup, the Dubai Art Festival, the Dubai Literature Festival and Polo championships.
11:30
My Dubai
Food & Gastronomy - Dubai's rich international dining scene, its food festival, Beach Canteen, the secret squirrel blogger, food tours of exotic restaurants, and genuine Emirati cuisine.
12:00
Diving With Crocodiles
In Africa's waterways, one predator reigns supreme – the Nile crocodile. One of the biggest and most deadly reptiles on Earth, it commands a fearsome reputation and strikes terror those who share its domain. Countless attacks in which victims are ruthlessly taken from riverbanks or attacked in their canoes leave no doubt that the Nile crocodile may views humans as natural prey. In fact, the animal was recently reclassified as the number one killer of humans in Africa, overtaking the previous record holder, the hippo. In "Diving with Crocodiles" cameraman and crocodile expert Brad Bestelink undertakes the unthinkable and dives into the waters of the Okavango Delta. Without a cage or any other protection, he gets up close and personal with these fearsome creatures in this groundbreaking film. Such a feat has never been recorded before. But Brad is well prepared – his decision to take the plunge is the result of many years spent studying crocodile behavior in his native Botswana. His window of opportunity to dive is small and dependent on the seasonal ebb and flow of the Okavango. There are only a couple of months each year when visibility in the delta allows for perfect filming conditions. This extraordinary film provides all the high drama associated with modern-day exploration, coupled with the exhilaration of interacting with wild animals. The underwater secrets of the Nile crocodile are revealed with unique and compelling footage in the pristine underwater environment of the Okavango delta.
13:00
Surrounded By Waves
The international scientific community is called on to take sides and provide solid answers. "Surrounded by Waves" explores the methods and motivations behind the most prominent research in the field and clarifies what we currently know, all with a mind to the social context behind the issue. Through an elegant blend of interviews, archives, experiments and 3D animation, the film clearly assesses the estimated risk linked to cell phones while offering a subtle observation of society's growing distrust of its industries and the unprecedented role of science in the debate.
14:00
Organic Panic
Food and agriculture are the front lines of the organic revolution. What you eat and how it's grown affects not just your life, but the lives of every person on the planet. Trauma nurse Stew Granger grew up on a farm and wants to return to his roots, but has questions about food politics and safety. \nSarah Elton, bestselling author and organic food activist, takes Stewart on a tour of a local organic market and explains how organic food is the only way to feed the planet and keep everyone from farm to table healthy and secure. Stewart meets economist and food geographer Professor Pierre Desrochers at the University of Toronto. The academic rejects the activist's claims and insists that intense, technological, industrial farming is the only way to feed a global population. Stewart decides that organic food is the compassionate choice.
14:25
Organic Panic
Fashion isn't just about adornment and style. What you wear can change the lives of people around the world, for better or worse. In this episode we look at how local designers and global chains respond to the growing demand for organic fashions. Furniture designer Lisa North is passionate about her personal style, but wonders if her clothes were made at the expense of garment workers' health and safety. Kelly Drennan, founder of Fashion Takes Action, a group committed to reforming the fashion industry, explains how toxic materials and waste from conventional clothes pollute the earth and cost you money. Emily Scarlett, PR manager for H&M takes Lisa on a tour of their private showroom and makes the case for a corporate giant doing more to promote organic materials than anyone else. Lisa's love of vintage clothes inspires her to simplify a complex problem.
14:50
Organic Panic
Is your home making your family sick? From cleaners to carpets, most of our homes are filled with potentially deadly chemicals. New mother Jaya Bone wants to keep her baby happy and healthy, but worries that she can't afford an all-organic house. She visits eco-expert Kym Klopp at her natural lifestyle store. Kym describes key home products and furnishings that can be toxic and identifies organic alternatives. Brendan Seale, Sustainability Manager for Ikea tries to convince Jaya that everything doesn't have to be organic to be safe. Jaya becomes emotional when she struggles to make the best choices for her daughter.
15:15
The Boy From the Wild
Growing up on a Game Reserve meant to help wildlife get out of captivity, it shares how it began & how Peter Meyer survived some incredible moments in the wild.
16:00
The New Cuba
Cuba, decades after the revolution. There is a new spirit emerging in Havana. Reforms are encouraging new business ideas and a large number of licenses have been issued for independent enterprise. The sale of real estate and cars has been legalized. In the socialist enclave of Cuba, there is now a spirit of letting visions and lifestyles become reality, of shaping a new Cuba. "ArteCorte" is such a dream come true. The master hair stylist Papito has built up the best beauty salon in the city. Customers love "ArteCorte" and are all very different from one another: young and old, proper and offbeat, poor and slightly less poor.
17:00
Grosslockner King Of the High Alps
The report accompanies Austrian farmers in the highest mountain of the country - the Glossglockner - from July until Christmas, throughout the changing seasons. It is mid-June and summer is finding its way into the valleys of East Tyrol, even though the Hohe Tauern Mountains are still covered with snow. In the distance, the Grossglockner gleams bright white above the Tyrol mountain village of Kals. This summer, mountain climbers from all over the world will scale the Grossglockner. Toni Riepler, a mountain guide from Kals and his wife Gitti have a lot of work to do. They run the "Glorerhütte", one of the oldest mountain huts in the area. For 3 months, from mid-June to mid-September, the family lives high up in the Alps. In the winter, they stay down in the valley.
18:00
The Arctic, A Boy Becomes A Hunter
On the North-Western tip of Greenland, fathers give their boys small dog sledges as soon as they can walk. The toy is meant to teach them hunting, a survival skill for Polar Inuits. Increasingly fewer boys, however, want to become hunters. 12-year-old Qaaqqukannguaq is an exception. During the spring holidays, he is going to accompany his father on a hunting trip for the first time. For several days, they will cross the ice desert on dog sledges, covering the 70 km from Savissivik, their tiny community, to Cape York.
19:00
Diving Off Cape Horn
Mid-July, during the Antarctic winter when night-time temperatures sink to -20ºC, marks the beginning of the Centolla season on Tierra del Fuego.\nSpider crabs can grow up to a half meter long and may only be caught during a few months. It's peak season for crab fishermen on Cape Horn. Taking their boats out to sea, they will hoist the popular delicacy out of the icy water.
20:00
On the Yeti Trail
Does the Yeti really exist? For the first time in over a century, the sometimes far-fetched Yeti legends and personal accounts have become the subject of state-of-the-art scientific studies. Several teams throughout the world, in Denmark, England, the US and Russia are carrying out a merciless competition to be the first to publish the revolutionary results – proof that another hominid, with very ancient roots, shares our existence. Our film sets out to meet the teams involved in this strange race across the world, and features laboratories, hair analysis, footprints and DNA as well as the search for samples in Indonesia and in Canadian nature reserves. A fascinating and thorough film, featuring, amongst others, French Collège de France paleoanthropologist Pascal Picq.
21:00
Animal Doctors
Explore how animals developed over time and generations their own medicine and health care strategies. How have these been passed onto early humans ? Questioning traditional boundaries between human and animal, we will travel from Central African Republic, to Tanzania, from the US to France with the leading experts in animal behaviour. Today\\'s science revisits the birth of animal intelligence and culture.
22:00
Depleted Uranium
More than 50 countries now possess weapons based on depleted uranium (DU). Experimentation has been rife, and the consequences for civilians and the military alike have been dramatic. This investigation compares and contrasts the arguments of those who defend and attack a technology that is highly toxic. For 20 years, scientists, doctors, veterans and activists have denounced the use of DU. Against them are the arms industry lobbyists and nuclear authorities who continue to minimise the risks. Through archive documents, interviews and in situ investigations, accompanied by key witnesses (victims, experts...) we aim to present a clearer picture of the issues and stakes linked to the use of DU. Quick-paced, with a sense of urgency, the film underlines the essential background and conflicting viewpoints, enabling viewers to make up their own minds about a subject that concerns us all.
23:00
Andalusia: The Moorish Architecture
Andalusia, the Spanish territory has a confluence of cultures which is represented in its architecture! Visigothic, Roman, Byzantine and Arab - the structures in the region display all these influences. Between 8th & 15th century, several dynasties from Arab to Berber conquered Andalusia impacting the way of life of people. The film tells this story through beautiful edifices of Andalusia.
2024-03-04
(pirmadienis)
00:05
The Science Of Magic
Our film follows researchers who are bringing magicians' tricks into the laboratory. With impossible magic, amazing facts, and opportunities for viewers to participate in the magic tricks, this extraordinary exploration peeks behind the curtain into a fascinating world where ancient magic meets modern science. Magician Julie Eng not only mystifies us with magic, she also takes us to Montreal's McGill University to meet Jay Olson who is using card tricks to study consciousness. His research also includes an MRI machine that can apparently not only read minds, but also manipulate thoughts. In the US we meet with professor Anthony Barnhart. He's a magician turned scientist who is using magic principles to investigate why we sometimes don't see what's right under our noses. We also meet Professor Amory Danek who is using the conjuror's craft to study creativity and problem solving.Professor Ronald Rensink at the University of British Columbia discovered how small distractions can blind drivers to obvious dangers. These studies naturally led him to work with magicians to explore possible new experiments.In London England Gustav Kuhn conducts a study that tracks the eye movements of the magician's audience. We see tricks that fool us despite nothing actually happening, as well as demonstrations that reveal we can be blind even to our own choices. Colourful and compelling, our film takes a critical and engaging look at the fascinating facts revealed when you see the human mind through the eyes of a magician.
01:00
The Ploushare Tortoise Of Madagascar
The angonoka tortoise, as the local Madagascans call the ploughshare tortoise, is an especially elegant tortoise with a high-domed golden shell. Reaching an age of well over 100 years, they are found in the wild only on Madagascar, off the south-eastern coast of Africa. Reptile collectors from around the world are frantic to obtain living specimens. However, the interest of Asians is limited to the shell, which is ground into a powder and is considered by many to be an aphrodisiac. Baly Bay National Park in Madagascar is the last natural refuge for the ploughshare tortoise.
02:00
The Condor Man From Argentina
Patagonia, a land of eternal winds and unspoilt nature, is home to the world's largest bird - the Andean Condor, with its average wingspan of 3 meters. In many places, the species has already become extinct. Ornithologist Lorenzo Sympson has been studying the birds for 25 years now. Lately, he has been focusing increasingly on the young animals. This year, he even wants to attach small webcams to the birds' nests that will provide a unique insight into the breeding and rearing behaviors of the rare Andean Condor.
03:00
Roll on Cinema
This film endeavours to show how the invention of cinema was in no way inevitable, and how it may well have been a mere accident. To pinpoint the start, it all began in the heart of Paris, in the depths of darkened room, on 28 March 1798, when Etienne-Gaspard Robertson gave one of his first screenings of his "Fantasmagoria" - making ghosts and spectres dance. But how did we move from perfecting the magic lantern to the cinematography of the Lumière brothers? The invention was born throughout the 19th century, out of the unpredictable crossing of two parallel research paths - that of philosophical toys and the photography of movement. Originally-named optical devices - such as the kinesigraph, the zoetrope, the praxinoscope and the phenakistoscope, without forgetting the photographic revolver or gun - associated the realm of toys with the realm of thought, reflecting both a fascination for the magical effects produced by animation and speed, and a desire to understand human anatomy, and analyse the phenomenon of vision. All these pre-cinema optical devices literally stemmed from a desire for spectacle and the will to acquire knowledge. Robertson, Reynaud, Plateau, Muybridge and Marey spearheaded the adventure. Thanks to these brilliant inventors, we travel across the 19th century, ending in Paris in 1895 in the Salon Indien du Grand Café, where the first public movie screening took place.
04:00
Taipan, the Most Dangerous Snake In the World
360 - GEO Report joins Professor Brian Grieg Fry as he carries out his thrilling job : catching the most dangerous snake in the world for his research. About 7 of the world's 10 most venomous snakes live in Australia: one of them is the taipan, said to be the most venomous in the world. Its venom can kill a horse in just seven seconds. Yet if someone actually dares to catch this extremely dangerous animal, its venom can be used as a medicine and can save lives. Professor Brian Grieg Fry is one of the very few, who takes up this life-threatening challenge. For the sake of his research institute, he travels regularly through the country catching taipans, as well as brown snakes, sea snakes and skinks.
05:00
Quirky Science
Plastic has become ubiquitous. Impressive, since we'd been living without them for centuries! We have grown dependent on plastics in many ways. The production industry uses it to connect the parts that make machinery: our trillions of toilet bowls need it, let alone wash machines, computers, toothbrushes, pens and traffic lights. Can you imagine that plastic was accidentally invented for the purpose of making billiard balls? Though, its inventor had used something now called guncotton, which led to a rather explosive game of pool. In the end, the first plastic was discovered when someone witnessed how Southeast Asian farmers used the poop of a little beetle, called shellac, to preserve wood. When looking for a substitute, Leo Beakeland created "Bakelite" and that substance turned out to be the first plastic. Nylon followed, the first man-made synthetic plastic, developed by Dupont to replace silk. Nylon isn't that difficult to make yourself, amazingly. During WW2 all nylon production went into the manufacturing of parachutes, leading Dupont and others to stop producing pantyhose. It led to true nylon riots. Plastics were plain out popular. Indeed, the age of plastic had only just begun. But plastic is made with oil and is hard to break down, which calls for a solution. A company in the US is creating a bioplastic grown inside microorganisms. In fact – soon they'll have plants cultivating plastic… plastic grown in the field? Now that is quirky!
05:30
Quirky Science
The Internet was invented during the cold war and launched in 1969. Yet it wasn't made for the public. In fact, it was developed for the army to communicate quickly and secretly so that no spies could intercept and no bombs could disrupt the sharing of information! It was nothing like we know today. The Internet involved computers exchanging text, on a black field with green letters, and e-mail was only invented 2 years later because the developers needed a reliable tool to communicate. So only in 1972 was this application; electronic mail, introduced. The Internet we know now was actually a second, separate invention, launched over a decade and a half after the Internet was first launched, and was called the 'World Wide Web'. Nobody was paying attention to Tim Berners-Lee and his pet idea, even though he had a radical new way for scientists to share data by linking documents to one another over the Internet! His proposal came back with the words "vague but exciting" written across the cover, so Berners-Lee took his invention to the people: with a website, bringing us the Internet we know today. Yet the Internet is only just out of its baby shoes, and is now being used to drive radical change in music and films, politics and business, changing the very way we see and interact with one another! From the computer screen to mass protests in the street, So what will the future bring us, how will the Web 3.0 change us? A web that can understand human needs?
06:00
Africa's Creative Killers
Peppered across Africa are a few iconic locations that are renowned for killing action. Arenas bathed in a history of blood, places where Africa's icons have hunted successfully for generations. Predators here develop unique and clever ways to hunt. But the circumstances aren't the driving factor in this story. Sometimes these predators look for the perfect patch of ground to kill, a small area of long grass, or a single path that leads to the perfect ambush. How do they amplify their age-old skills by using the lie of the land? The fastest mammal on the planet, Cheetah's don't only use speed to kill. They use look out points to scan for weak prey and a baby fawn as lure to get its mother to come closer. Africa's heavy weight the Lion is twice the weight and half the speed of the Cheetah. They need cover to hunt down their prey, so they stake out ambush points in Gullies, Marshland and Forest, lying in wait for their prey the wildebeest. We follow three characters through the Ndutu rainy season, starting with the arrival of the annual wildebeest migration, through to the wildebeest calves growing up and continuing their journey to the north-west. The film looks at how our characters use the environment and features of the landscape to their advantage. Reflecting on how they have learnt this from previous generations and will pass onto the next.
07:00
China Uncovered
From the skyscrapers of Shanghai to the mountainous peaks of "The Last Shangri-La", explore the breathtaking landscape of this incredible country and connect with the people that infuse China's everyday life with flavor, passion and prosperity. Through the eyes of a cultural academic, a laborer, an architect, an urban planner, and a photographer, the grand evolution of a little fishing village is illustrated and documented to reveal one of the fastest growing megacities in the world. And while the physical landscape gracefully moves towards the future, beliefs, behaviors, and practices are put into test. The changes brought by the Thirty Year Miracle are indeed immense, and it has left no stone, no life, unturned.
08:00
European Islands
The European islands are renowned primarily for their hotel resorts. However, we will show you a completely different face of theirs: forests, beaches, coves, mountains, valleys and rivers. Perhaps you will find places that will take your breath away. Why just lie on the beach when there is so much to see? Put on some good hiking shoes, pull your shoelaces tight, and get to know the entire island like the back of your hand.
08:30
European Islands
The European islands are renowned primarily for their hotel resorts. However, we will show you a completely different face of theirs: forests, beaches, coves, mountains, valleys and rivers. Perhaps you will find places that will take your breath away. Why just lie on the beach when there is so much to see? Put on some good hiking shoes, pull your shoelaces tight, and get to know the entire island like the back of your hand.
09:05
The Authentic Bahamas
The Bahamas - an archipelago in the western Atlantic that has long been the subject of legends. Over 700 islands and 2,000 coral reefs form this island paradise. Cat Island is one of the few continuously populated islands. In 2011, it was devastated by Hurricane Irene - the population is still coping with the aftermath. Untouched by tourism and tax havens, many people live on the poverty line. There is barely enough money to survive. Unemployment and hopelessness plunge them into lethargy. A few highly motivated women are now collecting ideas to inject hope and economic success into this island.
10:00
The Tech Effect
The Tech Effect is a portal to the future, a look at the forces and inventions that could shape us in the coming century. From e-sports to robotics, home automation to autonomous cars, this series examines the potential for cutting edge technology to improve our lives, while not ignoring the risks. The Tech Effect will appeal to anyone curious about exploring the technological advances that are changing our world. Sophisticated and edgy, each theme-based episode profiles the innovations transforming contemporary life. By identifying the world's most ingenious discoveries, we can unlock tomorrow, today. This episode investigates the jobs of the future, and why it might not be long before your co-worker is a robot. As industry changes, companies are identifying ways to re-train their workforce so they can be deployed in new roles. With space research becoming an important tool for innovation, we hear from a worker on the International Space Station about the types of experiments he conducts. Finally, we visit the factories of the future, discovering that, as a car has more lines of code than an F35 fighter jet, one of the most important jobs of the future in the automotive industry is software developer.
10:30
The Tech Effect
In this episode, we look at the ways robotic engineers are mimicking the natural world. BionicWheelBot and the BionicFlyingFox have been developed to navigate difficult terrain, like their biological counterparts. Robots like the canine-inspired models produced by Boston Dynamic are already being used in hazardous environments to reduce the need for humans to be exposed to risk. We'll also see how robots are covering new ground in space exploration, with smart autonomous vehicles destined for Mars, given greater capability than ever before. Finally, we visit some of the environments, such as offshore rigs and factories, where robots are being deployed in a range of jobs, including as exoskeletons for human workers, to reduce injuries and enhance endurance.
11:00
Sarah Shark
Sarah travels to one of the top 10 dive destinations in Australia (Julian Rocks, Byron Bay, NSW) to dive with three species of Wobbegong Sharks within the Cape Byron Marine Park. She also conducts a street poll with members of the public to find out what they think about sharks.
11:25
Sarah Shark
Sarah travels to one of the top 10 dive destinations in Australia (Julian Rocks, Byron Bay, NSW) to dive with three species of Wobbegong Sharks within the Cape Byron Marine Park. She also conducts a street poll with members of the public to find out what they think about sharks.
12:00
Wow, I Never Knew That!
Wow, I Never Knew That! is a whimsical, half-hour television series that is jam-packed with exciting tidbits and fascinating facts that uncover the truths and origins behind the stuff you're already familiar with. From the items you use every day to the phrases you use in conversation to the habits you're so accustomed to, you'll be fascinated to learn how they've all really come about! Learn how a pharmacist and an accountant created the most famous drink in the world, COCA COLA! And, learn the "BEAR" truth behind how a U.S. president helped create everyone's favorite stuffed toy, THE TEDDY BEAR! Then, how did a piece of wire accidentally "SLINK" its way to become a fantastic fun toy for children? Plus, how a the WIFFLE BALL was invented.
12:30
Wow, I Never Knew That!
Before computer drawing programs, there was a toy that if you mastered its two circular white knobs you could have a picture perfect SKETCH. We'll explain how the ETCH A SKETCH drew onto the scene. And what did Neil Armstrong REALLY say when he stepped on the moon, the "aahh" answer will surprise you! Plus, where did the explosive name BIKINI come from?
13:00
Versailles Furniture
Via six masterpieces, the film reveals the beauty of the spirit of Versailles of the 17th and 18th centuries. A unique homage to the people that crafted it, the furniture reveals the personal tastes of its commissioners, and portrays something that has ceased to exist!\nThese unique items of furniture that once belonged to Louis 14th, Louis 15th, Marie-Antoinette and Louis 16th have fascinating stories to tell: the tortoise-shell chest-of-drawers with inlays of brass; an astronomical clock - a veritable miracle of science; the most emblematic example of French furniture art in the world - the King's Desk; and the exquisite items made for Marie-Antoinette - the queen's jewellery case and the wheat-sheaf furniture.
14:00
Galicia's Death Cost
360°GEO - Report accompanies goose barnacle fishermen on a trip to the deadly cliffs. But even there, the goose barnacle population is declining rapidly.Their working district is the "Costa del Morte" - the "Coast of Death", where the oil tanker "Prestige" split apart in 2002. Here, the waves of the Atlantic are often lashed against the rocks by northwest gale force 8 winds.Their working district is the "Costa del Morte" - the "Coast of Death", where the oil tanker "Prestige" split apart in 2002. Here, the waves of the Atlantic are often lashed against the rocks by northwest gale force 8 winds.
15:00
The Seawomen Of Japan
For centuries, in Japan, mollusc fishing has been a women business. 360° Geo - Report takes a plunge into the closed world of a group of "Ama".For centuries, diving for seafood in Japan has been "ladies work" and is done by "Ama", or "women of the sea". They carry on collecting the precious seafood from the sea bottom until well into old age, braving the depths by the sheer virtue of their breath. Their skin is tanned by the elements, their voice roughened, deep and loud.For centuries, 9 women from the Japanese peninsula of Shima have shared their fate on a boat and grown together to become a close-knit sea-faring family. Kazu Yamamoto, at nearly 80 years of age, is the oldest in the group, a 5th-generation 'Ama'. She has by no means thought about giving up her work yet: "In the sea I can feel and move my body better than a shore. Once in the water all pain disappears, also suddenly my back doesn't hurt anymore", Kazu Yamamoto explains.
16:00
Secrets Of the Thracian King
In August 2004 in Bulgaria, archaeologist Georgi Kitov made a spectacular discovery in the valley of the Thracian Kings, a valley where about twenty temples and royal tombs are located. Kitov accessed a still-intact ancient tomb, which housed incredible wealth, dating back to the 4th century B.C., when Thracian culture was at its height.\nIn front of the gigantic mausoleum, archaeologists found a magnificent, life-sized bronze head, one of the period's finest specimens ever found, and possessing an unsettlingly modern style.\nWho was this king and what does his tomb tell us about Thracian culture? Was he buried according to the Thracian custom of Orphic rites, and what do we know today about these secret rites that promised eternal life?\nResearch into the deceased's identity revealed the tomb belonged to King Seuthes III. With the help of archaeologists and historians, who decipher the king's vestiges, the film pieces together the puzzle of Seuthes III's life. He was a modern king, who was open to Hellenisation, a warrior king, who was opposed to Macedonian authority, and a priest king, who was committed to preserving Thracian cultural rites.
17:00
Stolen Treasures
It's the biggest museum in the world…the museum of artworks stolen over the centuries and never rediscovered. These works haunt the nightmares of their owners, and occupy the days of hundreds of police officers across the world, as well as those of a handful of private agencies; no country or museum of importance can claim to have been spared.\nAccording to Interpol, art theft is the fourth largest criminal trade, after the drug trade, the weapons trade and money laundering. How could it be otherwise, when the soaring price of art propels the value of some paintings into the tens of millions of Euros?\nThis world appears to be full of mysteries. Crime syndicates rub shoulders with petty criminals and the police care more about recovering the items than they do about arresting the perpetrators.
17:45
Infestation
Every single day there is a growing number of people to feed and in the next thirty to forty years we will need to double our food production to sustain the increase in population. In this episode author Julian Cribb examines the infestations that are threatening our food supply.
18:35
Mongolia, Steppes Emirate
Battered by strong winds, and seen as a grazing land, Mongolia is the kingdom of steppes. With important mineral resources such as copper or uranium, coal and rare soil, Mongolia future is secure: the economy shows a significant growth rate and it is a business paradise for some expatriates. But for most of the population, needs remain unfulfilled.
19:00
Great White Code Red
The Great White shark is a highly complex predator with advanced sensory weaponry. Two shark specialists, Dr Craig O'Connell and Dr Geremy Cliff look beneath the skin of the Great White to reveal the true source of its extraordinary predatory abilities and discover the secrets of one the world's most feared predators.
20:00
Paraguay's New Houses
In Paraguay,  the loofah plant is used to make vegetable sponges but nowadays, it can also used to build houses. 360°GEO - Report follows Elsa Zaldivar on her quest to free Paraguay from its housing shortage.Until recently, the loofah plant in Paraguay had fallen into oblivion. But over the past few years, it has experienced a successful comeback - as bath sponge. Today, loofah sponges are sold throughout the world.According to Elsa Zaldivar, loofah is now also being used in the construction of houses. The once densely wooded countryside has today been largely chopped down. Many people do not have access to affordable building materials. The idea of the loofah-cooperative is to compound loofah remains with plastic waste in order to create a a solid building material for house walls.
21:00
Falkland Islands Penguins Advancing Forward
360° GEO - Report captures the rough beauty of the Falkland Islands on camera, and plunges into the life of the penguin colonies at the far end of the world.\nThe Falkland Islands is an archipelago in the South Atlantic, not far from the South American continent. In the 1980's, England and Argentina fought a cruel war for sovereignty. Altogether on both sides, about 1,000 people lost their lives before the Argentinians surrendered. Today, the roughly 700 islands of the British Overseas Territory are once again a natural paradise: thousands of penguins crowd the coast, while the almost 3,000 inhabitants lead a "British way of life" and try to do their best given their economic and territorial isolation, at 12,600 km from London.
22:00
Kyuchu: Where the Green Tea Grows
This report shows how the famous Japanese green tea is cultivated, explores its healing power and explains how deeply the tea has penetrated Japanese society. For the Japanese people, green tea is more than just an ordinary beverage. It is the key to the national culture - it combines enjoyment, philosophy and the art of living. In springtime, the entire country waits for the first flush, the very first harvest of the precious Sencha tea from the island of Kyushu, the world's biggest organic tea production region.
23:00
Unbreathable Cities on the Verge Of Asphyxiation
With an epidemic of cancers among adults, and widespread asthma among children, China and India are on a constant health alert. Nor is the rest of the world free from harm as the pollutants are travelling.
2024-03-05
(antradienis)
00:00
Wonder
Seg 1 Chromatic Adaptation. Chromatic adaptation is the ability of humans to adjust to changes in brightness to keep up with the appearance of colors. this is the reason why we are able to perceive colors properly even though lighting in real environments change constantly. Seg 2 Color-changing animals. Color changing in animals are developed adaptations which the animals use for various applications such as signaling their species or as a way to hide from predators. Animals that can change color have specialized cells called chromatophores that can alter pigmentation and light reflecting properties. Seg 3 How do we see the color pink. We are able to see pink because our brains are able to perceive variations in light and color. Although pink as a wavelength does not exist in the light spectrum, it is our brains that processes light in a such a way that we are able to perceive combinations of colors thus giving us a way to see colors like pink. Seg 4 Blue wings, blue feathers. Blue rarely exists in nature. But due to evolution, structural features in the wings and feathers of some animals allow light to bend in ways that make it possible to reflect the color blue. Seg 5 Snow camouflage. Snow camouflage, is a type of camouflage that certain creatures use to hide during winter. It is typically characterised by differing shades of grays and whites.
00:30
Wonder
Seg 1 Monty Hall problem. The Monty Hall Problem poses a counter-instinctive dilemma of picking a choice with a higher probability of winning. It has been calculated that switching from a player's initial choice to the last option possible, after eliminating all empty choices, instead of sticking with the initial choice gives a bigger chance of winning. Seg 2 The Birthday Problem. The Birthday Problem presents a situation that addresses brains' unintuitive response to exponents. We try to figure out why it's possible for only 23 people to have a 50% chance of sharing a birthday when there are 365 unique birthdays. The dilemma usually comes in when we gloss over the fact that even small groups can form several pairings, and we actually compute the probability of sharing a birthday by subtracting the chances of not sharing a birthday by multiplying individual probabilities with each other. The answers can be quite surprising when the math to be done is not instinctive for people. Seg 3 Gambler's ruin. Gambler's Ruin closes in on how a gambler with the smaller amount will always be the loser in the long run in a game of 50-50 chance with an indefinite number of rounds playing. Gambler's Ruin also debunks the "luck" factor by emphasizing that each round played has its separate probability from previous rounds, thus maintaining chances of winning at 50%. Seg 4 The Infinite Hotel Paradox. The Infinite Hotel Paradox shows how infinity, for all its vastness, cannot be fully grasped, especially when it goes beyond the confines of the countable infinity. The paradoxical part comes in when the union of two sets with infinite elements will still be infinity; adding, subtracting, multiplying, or dividing infinity with infinity is still infinity. Seg 5 The Locker Riddle. The Locker Riddle stimulates how good and fast a person is at factorization. In the problem, the key is identifying which numbers from 1-100 are perfect squares, but the solution lies in the number of factors those particular numbers have. Perfect squares have odd numbered factors because one factor will be multiplied by itself and it only counts as one in the riddle's context, leaving those locker numbers open in an alternating open-close pattern.
01:00
Race of Life
There are many fine examples of evolutionary history in the natural world. Animals adapt through a series of small, random mutations and usually do so in order to compete more effectively for food, water and space. Animals with certain adaptations are more likely to be stronger and therefore produce more young. Crocodiles are certainly of an ancient lineage, they are believed to be 200 million years old, whereas dinosaurs became extinct 64 million years ago. Crocodiles have an incredible ability to adapt and survive in the Race of Life. They have a very slow metabolism, and can go up to a year with no food. They also have a 4 chamber heart that helps them control their temperature, and lungs that allow them to hold their breath underwater for up to 2 hours. Sharks have gone through the process of adaptation and evolutionary experimentation as well. The modern descendants of ancient sharks have incorporated many of the successful traits of the past. They have changed over time, but the changes have not been too extreme, only nature perfecting an originally near perfect design. Whales are an amazing species that have evolved from land dwelling creatures millions of years ago to the marine mammals we know today. Over the course of their evolution whales have developed echolocation, thick layers of blubber, modified lungs, better hearing and larger arteries among other things to ensure their survival and prosperity.
01:30
Race of Life
Deserts are dry. Deserts are extreme. True deserts get less than 18 cm of rain per year. True deserts have very few plants. Semi-desert habitats have enough rainfall to support more plant and animal life. Either way, deserts are not easy places for animals to live. Desert animals have evolved to handle the desert's heat and lack of water. They have adapted their bodies and behaviors to the desert climate. Most can survive on small amounts of water and many get all of their water from their food. Some drink maybe once a week and travel considerable distances to find isolated waterholes and springs. Large animals seek shade during the hottest part of the day. Some animals dig a hollow depression into the ground and lie in the cooler soil while others are nocturnal. Many reptiles and other animals protect themselves from the extreme temperature by spending their time in burrows. The scorpion is one of the most ancient creatures on earth, in existence since life first crawled out of the sea. One look and you can see why they're born survivors. Not only are their bodies armoured against the desert heat – and other predators – but all scorpions have pincers at the front and a poisonous sting at the end of their tail. Rattlesnakes can be two meters long. They're fast, tough and with a deadly venom, making them one of the most dangerous snakes in the world. But nobody seems to have told the Roadrunner, who regard rattlesnakes as quite suitable prey.
02:00
Travel Thru History
Travel Thru History is an Emmy-nominated, un-hosted lifestyle/travel series designed to spark interest and enthusiasm in viewers about our world's rich and fascinating history by traveling to diverse locales across the globe. Locations include New Orleans, Las Vegas, Oslo, Belize, Dublin and more. In this episode we visit the Kennedy Space Center located on Florida's famous "Space Coast." We'll speak to NASA engineers about the past, present and future of American space travel, as well as take a look at the attractions KSC has to offer.
02:25
Travel Thru History
In this episode we explore Las Vegas' lesser known past. We visit the National Atomic Testing museum to learn about how the desert outside of Vegas was used for testing America's secret nuclear weapons. We also visit the Mormon Fort, the first permanent non-native settlement in the area, as well as the Neon Museum.
02:50
Past Hunters
The former home of Queen Victoria is now home to many spirits who have been seen by guests and staff. Witness the first ever formal documentation of the paranormal activities in the Bulkeley Hotel.
03:35
Travel Thru History
We travel to the end of the rainbow in Dublin, Ireland. We'll gawk at the Book of Kells, a holy book displayed at Trinity College. We visited the hallowed halls of St. Patrick's Cathedral, and touched famed Irishman, Daniel O'Connell's crypt at Glasnevin Cemetery. Finally, we learn the complicated history of Irish independence at Kilmainham jail.
04:00
Street Football In My Country
Street Football is a worldwide phenomenon that can be played by anyone, no matter their age, their gender or where they come from. It can be played anywhere, no need for a stadium, white lines, green grasses or even shoes ! In each episode of these series we take you to an emerging country where Football has become a way of helping children and bringing hope by life changing their habits. Discover the attaching portraits of these children that might one day become some of the greatest players in the world just like before them C. Ronaldo, Messi, Neymar and so many others.
04:30
Street Football In My Country
Street Football is a worldwide phenomenon that can be played by anyone, no matter their age, their gender or where they come from. It can be played anywhere, no need for a stadium, white lines, green grasses or even shoes ! In each episode of these series we take you to an emerging country where Football has become a way of helping children and bringing hope by life changing their habits. Discover the attaching portraits of these children that might one day become some of the greatest players in the world just like before them C. Ronaldo, Messi, Neymar and so many others.
05:00
Organic Panic
What are the health costs of beauty? In this episode, we examine products like lipstick, foundation, eyeliner and mascara. Aspiring actress Gracie Robbin is concerned about the health risks she takes in order to be beautiful. She visits with celebrated broadcaster, journalist and author Gill Deacon. Gill believes that years of using conventional makeup may have led to her breast cancer. She describes the toxic effects of the chemicals found in conventional makeup and offers organic alternatives. Scientist, academic and "fraud buster" Dr. Joe Schwarcz explains the science behind the ingredients and insists that conventional beauty products are perfectly safe for Gracie to use. Gracie tells us about a health scare in her own family and draws her own conclusions about what's best for her.
05:25
Organic Panic
In episode 2 we explore the more "nourishing" side of personal products, examining moisturizers, cleansers and toothpaste. Lawyer Holly Rasky worries that her favourite products are going to make her sick. Author and EcoHolic activist Adria Vasil takes her on a pharmacy tour and explains how Canada's lax regulations allow manufacturers to include potentially toxic chemicals in our most intimate products, chemicals that are banned in the rest of the world. Reluctant to give up her favourite toothpaste, Holly speaks with former health minister Darren Praznik who assures her that the government does everything it can to protect her and that industry has strong incentives to keep her safe. Health Canada chimes in with facts and figures to show they are Canadians best defense against dangerous products.
05:45
Wild Australia with Ray Mears
Ray Mears explores the Great Barrier Reef starting on the Queensland mainland taking a boat out to Hervey Bay with whale expert Wally Franklin. They witness a mother hump back whale teaching her three month old calf the whale moves needed to survive the long migration to Antarctica.He flies out to Lady Elliot Island at the southernmost tip of the Great Barrier Reef where he goes scuba diving on the coral reef and discovers giant turtles and manta rays and shoals of big eyed trevelly fish.Back on the island Ray helps marine biologist Maggie O'Neal plant a Pisonia tree and finds out how the Pisonia trees kill the Black Noddy bird's that nest in them in order to use their corpses as a fertile compost given the unforgiving ground of a coral island.
06:10
Wild Australia with Ray Mears
Ray Mears journeys into the remote wilderness region of Arnhem land to the Cooper Creek Billabong. He's there during the dry season and all the wild life is concentrated into a narrow stretch of water. He comes face to face with the dominant saltwater crocodile and watches as the croc manoeuvres a dead pig down river to a secret hiding place. When Ray gets too close warns him off.Ray travels into Stone Country above the Billabong where he finds a gallery of ancient Aboriginal art and joins locals Connie Nayinggul and her grandson Moses on a fishing expedition. They catch a barramundi and cook the fish in a traditional ground oven using paper bark.Finally Ray travels with land manager Greg Towns across the dried up mudflats through giant flocks of Magpie Geese. Ray helps Greg to burn away large meadows of alien and destructive grass that is killing the birds. In a dramatic scene Ray witnesses the spectacle of farming with fire.
06:35
Wild Australia with Ray Mears
In Victoria just south west of Melbourne in the You Yangs National Park Ray Mears meets up with researcher Janine Duffy in a dry eucalyptus forest. They go in search of koalas and find a young male who nervously tries to establish his own territory.Ray moves down to the open grasslands and tracks a mob of Eastern Grey kangaroos. He visits the Mount Rothwell Conservation Reserve and meets an unusual marsupial – a predator – that is almost extinct on the mainland of Australia – a Tiger Quoll – smaller relative of the Tasmanian Devil. Finally Ray journeys through a Wet Eucalyptus forest to Lake Elizabeth and canoeing across the quiet waters finds himself surrounded by rare and unique duck billed platypuses
07:00
China Uncovered
China runs on two gears as it moves millions of people around every day. A young driver of one of the world's fastest trains and two seasoned pilots of one of the world's biggest airlines are seeing the effects modernization and globalization have on their journeys. Meanwhile, in downtown Shanghai a recreational revolution is taking place as the youth choose bikes and skateboards over four wheels.
08:00
A Year in the Wild
Rosemary catches up with the conservancy's rarest large carnivore, a coalition of 3 male cheetahs. The Pungwe pack get waist deep into their hunting as they pursue a wildebeest into a water pan. Denning season has begun. The pack are on the hunt for impala. Rosemary deals with a shocking snare removal. The splinters take on another herd of wildebeest.
08:45
Capture Wild School
Very quick intro to the history of the course and the make up of the influx of new students as well as a look at some of the lecturers and their characters. Darting practice and drug theory: Students practice with dart guns from certain distances and learn the theory of dangerous drugs. The next step is learning to dart from a helicopter. A moving target is towed by a vehicle, and students have 1 dart to prove their accuracy. Darting practice on donkeys: 3 teams are formed and they have 3 donkeys to dart and check all vital signs. Darting 2 young antelope: 2 students are chosen to dart a young Rhone antelope and young Sable needing medical attention.
09:10
Creative Killers
Peppered across Africa are a few iconic locations that are renowned for killing action. Arenas bathed in a history of blood, places where Africa's icons have hunted successfully for generations. Predators here develop unique and clever ways to hunt. But the circumstances aren't the driving factor in this story. Sometimes these predators look for the perfect patch of ground to kill, a small area of long grass, or a single path that leads to the perfect ambush. How do they amplify their age-old skills by using the lie of the land? Savuti is big cat country. But only the most resourceful cats make it to the top.The Marsh Pride, Savuti's resident lions, is faced with their toughest challenge this winter: Buffalo. The complicated mix of boggy marsh, open plains and dense woodland provide extra obstacles in their path to a meal. Over centuries these heavyweights have adapted their hunting strategy to Savuti's every challenge and the buffalos' every move. And their secret: The nighttime hunt. When the sun sets, the tables begin to turn and Savuti is at the pride's mercy. But there's no shortage of challenges: Saba, the pride matriarch and most experienced hunter, has got to provide for her pride and keep them, and her territory, safe from two young male lions that are trespassing on Marsh Pride territory. It all seems doable until she gets injured after a run-in with hyenas… A lone female leopard is Savuti's ultimate innovator. Her environment has forced her to change her hunting strategy and her prey, and she's thriving!We follow three characters through Savuti's winter, starting with the disappearance of the small game and the arrival of the buffalo. The film looks at how our characters use the environment and features of the landscape to their advantage. We focus on the numerous challenges of Savuti – the things that make it such a hostile place for predators, and also highlight the inter-predatory battles between the Marsh Pride and the Nomads. We look at the challenges the young leopard is faced with while hunting under the lions' radar and trying to survive in her non-leopard-friendly environment.
10:00
The Tech Effect
In this episode we examine advances in aviation that include flying cars being developed by Slovakian and Japanese companies. Ride share companies are also considering aerial options, with Uber among those working on autonomous urban aircraft that will fly over congested roads to landing points in the centre of cities. As the skies of the future will be teeming with flying vehicles, suitable air traffic management is essential. We look at new systems to connect autonomous aircraft with each other and an overarching traffic control. Finally, we explore a concept airliner of the future. Sustainable and flexible, it incorporates holograms and neural networks to provide a more engaging and relaxing flight.
10:30
The Tech Effect
In this episode we travel on a space tourist test flight that flies high above the Earth. It's just one of the options available for wealthy thrill-seekers looking to defy gravity on a trip above our atmosphere. We also look at the latest spacesuits designed by NASA for extra-vehicular activity, or floating in space. Finally, we get an update on the Artemis project, the plan to send men and women to the moon this decade. Artemis requires cooperation between all the major space agencies to build a huge new space station called Gateway, that will also be the launch pad for a crewed mission to Mars this century.
11:00
Sarah Shark
Sarah travels to one of the top 10 dive destinations in Australia (Julian Rocks, Byron Bay, NSW) to dive with three species of Wobbegong Sharks within the Cape Byron Marine Park. She also conducts a street poll with members of the public to find out what they think about sharks.
11:25
Sarah Shark
Sarah travels to one of the top 10 dive destinations in Australia (Julian Rocks, Byron Bay, NSW) to dive with three species of Wobbegong Sharks within the Cape Byron Marine Park. She also conducts a street poll with members of the public to find out what they think about sharks.
12:00
Wow, I Never Knew That!
On a hot summer's day, nothing cools you down like a frozen fruity POPSICLE! You'll learn how an 11-year old boy created this sweet icy treat! And, have you ever noticed those colored spinning poles outside the BARBERSHOP? You'll be in STITCHES when you learn how they got their start! Plus, find out how a melting chocolate bar gave way to the invention of the MICROWAVE!
12:30
Wow, I Never Knew That!
It was the PURRRFECT idea for making our furry friends more pleasant around the house! You'll learn how KITTY LITTER clawed its way into our homes. And you'll learn how a garment made out of special woven fibers can stop a bullet, plus, why is walking under a ladder bad luck? And finally, we'll CUT TO THE CHASE and explain the history behind this common phrase!
13:00
Apple the Tyranny Of Cool
Apple, the brand that symbolises counter-culture, has become a giant that dictates cultural norms and trends. At the root of their success story lies the genius marketing ploy of making mainstream power look tacky by declaring themselves counter to it, thereby conquering consumers with their cool. The death of Steve Jobs, on October 5th, provided a dramatic illustration of the paradox of Apple, which is at the heart of this film. It is the first time in history that an entrepreneur has been applauded and mourned as a benefactor of mankind, and their commercial success lauded as a work of genius. This fascinating ability to combine a "rebel-brand" image with huge commercial profits will be the object of this documentary investigation, which examines both the universe of Mac and modern man and his ambiguities. Tracing the history of the brand, from the beginnings of the small computer company to today's multinational, the film shows how Apple has taken a giant bite out of the market, thanks to its aesthetic choices, emotional marketing and indisputable technological ingenuity.
14:00
Capture Wild School
Very quick intro to the history of the course and the make up of the influx of new students as well as a look at some of the lecturers and their characters. Darting practice and drug theory: Students practice with dart guns from certain distances and learn the theory of dangerous drugs. The next step is learning to dart from a helicopter. A moving target is towed by a vehicle, and students have 1 dart to prove their accuracy. Darting practice on donkeys: 3 teams are formed and they have 3 donkeys to dart and check all vital signs. Darting 2 young antelope: 2 students are chosen to dart a young Rhone antelope and young Sable needing medical attention.
14:30
Capture Wild School
A student darter is selected to dart from the helicopter and soon a suitable giraffe is located. The dart location is perfect and the giraffe begins to slow down as the rest of the team jump into action. The giraffe becomes more of a challenge as it wrestles with the rope and breaks free. The drugs eventually take full effect and the giraffe is subdued. The team carry out all the checkups, take samples and reverse the drug in good time to see it run off in good health. The vet lecturers give the debrief and conclude with all the positives and negatives.
15:00
India's Jungle Book Hospital
In the densely populated India, living space for wild animals is getting short. Around the country land is being cultivated and houses are constructed. India's only scientifically run rehabilitation center offers shelter for wild animals. Here veterinarians Dr. Phulmoni Gogi and Dr. Prasanta Boro take care of ill and injured animals, which got in conflict with civilization and would have hardly survived on their own: a feverish buffalo, a dozen orphaned elephants and a young rhinoceros. With a lot of dedication and patience, the doctors aim is to slowly raise the awareness of the people to save the wild animals.
16:00
Johana: Make Up And Motor Oil
Colombia is the third largest exporter of coffee in the world. The main status symbol of its flourishing regions is the Willys Jeep. We met Johana, the only Willys female driver, who is entering this year's Willys contest. This is the jeep "that won the Second World War", the model that created the later legendary "Jeep". About 600,000 Willys Jeeps were manufactured by the US-Army during World War II. After 1945, many discarded Jeeps were delivered to Colombia, considered as "mula con motor","donkeys with engines". Mostly men can be found behind the wheel. But Johana is an exception.
17:00
Stolen Treasures
It's the biggest museum in the world…the museum of artworks stolen over the centuries and never rediscovered. These works haunt the nightmares of their owners, and occupy the days of hundreds of police officers across the world, as well as those of a handful of private agencies; no country or museum of importance can claim to have been spared.\nAccording to Interpol, art theft is the fourth largest criminal trade, after the drug trade, the weapons trade and money laundering. How could it be otherwise, when the soaring price of art propels the value of some paintings into the tens of millions of Euros?\nThis world appears to be full of mysteries. Crime syndicates rub shoulders with petty criminals and the police care more about recovering the items than they do about arresting the perpetrators.
17:45
Infestation
Water covers 71% of the Earth's surface and is the medium of life. All life forms and their surrounding ecosystems are dependent upon water, without it we would cease to exist. Director of Notre Dame's Environmental Change Initiative, Dr. David Lodge examines the infestations that are spreading throughout our fresh and salt water systems and clogging our precious waterways.
18:35
New Caledonia, the Seaweed Promise
With its three nickel factories, New Caledonia is on the way to becoming one of the leading emitters of CO2 in the world. But some inhabitants are trying to make a change. May seaweed be the solution?
19:00
Flying Over the Earth
A young French couple, Clémentine Bacri and Adrien Normier set off on a one year long journey around the planet on board a light aircraft dedicated to science and education. Their goal: offer aerial support to public research laboratories, an unique opportunity to discover scientific activities and use them to teach science at school. In research areas, the crew has implemented observation and modeling techniques that are key elements for research.
19:30
Flying Over the Earth
A young French couple, Clémentine Bacri and Adrien Normier set off on a one year long journey around the planet on board a light aircraft dedicated to science and education. Their goal: offer aerial support to public research laboratories, an unique opportunity to discover scientific activities and use them to teach science at school. In research areas, the crew has implemented observation and modeling techniques that are key elements for research.
20:00
Galla Wallah: The Search For The Best
The valleys of Nepal, around the Himalayan Mountains - the highest in the world - are the home of a special group of people callled the Ghurkhas. Because of the discipline and endurance they exhibit in their daily fight for survival, they are employed in the elite battalion of the British Army. For more than 200 years, the Ghurkhas have served the crown. Every year, more than 25,000 people apply for a position as a Ghurkhas, with only a few lucky ones chosen. For the chosen ones, it feels as though they have hit the jackpot. For the others, it is considered to be the worst defeat of their life.
21:00
Surrounded By Waves
The international scientific community is called on to take sides and provide solid answers. "Surrounded by Waves" explores the methods and motivations behind the most prominent research in the field and clarifies what we currently know, all with a mind to the social context behind the issue. Through an elegant blend of interviews, archives, experiments and 3D animation, the film clearly assesses the estimated risk linked to cell phones while offering a subtle observation of society's growing distrust of its industries and the unprecedented role of science in the debate.
22:00
Against the Tide
The film is a touching story focusing on the struggle of Albert (21), as he chooses to battle cancer on his own terms whilst trying to help others around the world undergoing the same traumatic experience.
23:00
Incan Salt
360° GEO - Report observed salt miners in the Peruvian Mountains. This documentary portrays the harsh day-to-day lives of the "Salineros" as they work in a stunningly beautiful South American mountain landscape. The salt mines of Maras are situated in the highlands of the Peruvian Andes at an altitude of about 3.000 meters. They form a vast manmade labyrinth of salt wells. A thousand terraced wells collect the warm salty waters from the mountain. When the water evaporates under the strong sun, on the edges and bottom of the waterholes a precious white crust is left. This is Maras-Salt. To this very day, the descendants of the Incas harvest their "White Gold of the Andes" using this traditional method.
2024-03-06
(trečiadienis)
00:00
Wonder
Seg 1 Carrion flowers. Carrion flowers are the unorthodox perception of flowers for they are rare, big, and very unpleasant. Other terms are stink flowers and corpse flowers. The biggest flower in the world, rafflesia arnoldii, is a carrion flower. These flowers are difficult to find and reproduce and could breed through cross-pollination by attracting flies and dung beetles. Seg 2 Aposematism. Aposematism is a form of signalling that enables protection for both preys and predators by giving signs of poison and danger through showing off the bright colors and patterns on their epidermal layers that become associated with inedibility. Some species have developed mimicry based on aposematism in order to avail the protection aposematic colors give. Seg 3 Cuckoo Misdirection. Cuckoo misdirection demonstrates the mimicking abilities of a female cuckoo in order to find host nests to hatch her eggs. The female mimics a cry of a predator bird in order to frighten the hosts, leaving them vulnerable, thus the cuckoo can seize the chance to drop her egg on a host nest. Seg 4 Pheromones. Animal pheromones are the chemicals secreted and released by different species to communicate with other organisms. There are various types serving different purposes, ranging from reproduction, to trailing, to alarms. Some pheromones are also specific to one species of animals. Seg 5 Deimatic Behavior. Deimatic behavior is another type of defensive behavior in animals that also involves mimicry. It's the opposite of aposematism because while aposematism works by blatantly showing or signalling its danger or unpalatability, deimatic behavior relies on the element of surprise to startle predators in\norder for species to flee to safety.
00:30
Wonder
Seg 1 Saccadic Eye Masking. Saccadic eye movements are characterized as the fast movement of eyes when perceiving motion. These are so fast that they are blurred. To compensate for the blurriness, our brains mask these blurred visions to help us see a completed albeit masked version of sight. Seg 2 Plant Movement. While plants do not exhibit movement for locomotion or moving from place to place, they still exhibit\nmovement in response to different stimuli. These movements are plant adaptations for food production, plant reproduction and survival. Seg 3 The Language of Color. Language plays a major role in how people from different parts of the world perceive color. The fact that some languages completely lack terms for some colors that other languages have come to know offers insight on how much influence it has on the way people see colors. Seg 4 Color Blindness. Color blindness is the condition that makes people not able to properly see and perceive colors. Color blindness is the result of damaged or underdeveloped rods and cones. these are the light sensitive cells that can be found in the part of our eyes known as the retina which are responsible for seeing colors. Color blindness can either be genetic or caused by sustained damage to the retina over time. Seg 5 Perspective Illusion. This is a technique used in illustrations to render scenes and objects in 3 dimensions with depth and foreshortening. The technique was pioneered by Italian painters during the renaissance period. It involves drawing objects with reference to points measured from a constant line of sight.
01:00
Race of Life
Synopsis: These are Nature's own Battletanks, and (with the exception of the Indian Elephant), all endemic to the African continent. The African Savannah is the stage for thousands of battles every day. How do elephants, these large, cumbersome creatures survive and even prosper on a diet that even the strictest vegetarian would pass on! Well for one thing, most other animals get out of their way. But lions and hyenas are not always so easily moved – they prey on young, sick and old elephants in particular. This seemingly gentle giant has been revealed to have a darker side in the last few years too. They may survive on just plant life, but that doesn't mean they don't like a fight – to the death. Elephants have been observed attacking and killing Rhinos in the last 20 years. It's a savage clash. Meanwhile, the Rhino, a tough looking customer if ever there was one, is an endangered species. When the great herds go on the search for food, predators go on the hunt for them. If ever there was an animal that seems destined to survive, it's the Rhino, which has been around for over 6 million years. But it too has an enemy: mankind – the deadliest foe of all. Then there's the hippopotamus. An adult hippo is a huge, aggressive animal, and even the largest crocodiles tend to stay away from it. However, when baby hippos stray from their mothers, then crocodiles, lions and hyenas will have a go if they can get away without being attacked themselves by adults in the baby hippo's herd. That's why baby hippos must stay close to Mum
01:30
Race of Life
Males and females of most species will fight viciously in self-defense. And females, can be even more aggressive than males when defending their young. In this episode we'll explore the Race of Life from the point of view of food, territory, social status, and mates. Though some fights occur between two different species, most battles are fought between members of the same species. Though the wildlife warriors in these battles usually are not trying to kill each other, the fighting can result in death. Why would members of the same species fight with such ferocity? Food is one reason. Animals that store and horde food for survival will aggressively protect their pantries. Animals are also willing to fight to protect their food indirectly. For example, predators will defend a territory that provides them with enough prey, or food, to survive. This territorial aggression serves to space out members of a species across their range in a way that maintains sufficient food within each territory. But it also may limit population size. For example, if a pack of wolves cannot find, defend, or take over a suitable territory, the members may starve to death. Though food, territory, social status, and mates may be won and kept by fighting, aggression takes its toll. Animal combatants face exhaustion, injuries, time away from resting and eating, and the ultimate cost of battle: death. Thus, just like human beings, it's often in an animal's interest to win a war before it ever begins - or to avoid confrontation altogether.